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Peyton Manning Example of Sexual Assault Pulls A Cosby/Trump: Belittle Women You Sexually Assault

March 2, 2016

What do Donald Trump and Peyton Manning have in common? Sexual assault against a woman over whom they had power. Sexual assault claims that were “hushed up.” Sexual assault claims the public would like to forget. Trump supporters say that rape “can’t happen” between spouses, and Manning claims that pushing his testicles into a woman’s face was just a “joke.” Of course sexual assault didn’t occur for either man according to his own opinion. The women’s story is vastly different.

his [Trump] ex-wife Ivana Trump once used “rape” to describe an incident between them in 1989. She later said she felt “violated” by the experience.

Michael Cohen, special counsel at The Trump Organization, defended his boss, saying, “You’re talking about the frontrunner for the GOP, presidential candidate, as well as a private individual who never raped anybody. And, of course, understand that by the very definition, you can’t rape your spouse.”

“It is true,” Cohen added. “You cannot rape your spouse. And there’s very clear case law.”

And we are back to the “women are property” argument Trump endorses. Check out Trump’s other misogynist comments here. (Trump doesn’t know the what the word misogynist means, so we are safe from him ever reading this…)

Ivana’s response is much different, saying Trump raped her when he was angry, and then she later “clarified” to remove the term rape, but her story is one of Trump committing rape:

The book, by former Texas Monthly and Newsweek reporter Harry Hurt III, described a harrowing scene. After a painful scalp reduction surgery to remove a bald spot, Donald Trump confronted his then-wife, who had previously used the same plastic surgeon.

“Your fucking doctor has ruined me!” Trump cried.

What followed was a “violent assault,” according to Lost Tycoon. Donald held back Ivana’s arms and began to pull out fistfuls of hair from her scalp, as if to mirror the pain he felt from his own operation. He tore off her clothes and unzipped his pants.

“Then he jams his penis inside her for the first time in more than sixteen months. Ivana is terrified… It is a violent assault,” Hurt writes. “According to versions she repeats to some of her closest confidantes, ‘he raped me.’”

Following the incident, Ivana ran upstairs, hid behind a locked door, and remained there “crying for the rest of night.” When she returned to the master bedroom in the morning, he was there.

“As she looks in horror at the ripped-out hair scattered all over the bed, he glares at her and asks with menacing casualness: ‘Does it hurt?’” Hurt writes.

Notice the only defense Trump offers is that “you can’t rape your spouse” based supposedly on law, not that he had a consensual sexual experience with his wife, merely that because she was his wife, it wasn’t rape. Oh, and that even though his wife felt raped, because Trump says it wasn’t rape, it wasn’t.

“It’s not the word that you’re trying to make it into,” Cohen told The Daily Beast, saying Ivana Trump was talking about how “she felt raped emotionally… She was not referring to it [as] a criminal matter, and not in its literal sense, though there’s many literal senses to the word.”

Trump’s wife said she felt raped. Trump says you can’t rape a spouse, so it wasn’t rape. What happened to these charges? Swept away, just like Peyton Manning. What does Peyton Manning have to blame his sexual assault on? Having women nearby.

Peyton Manning, well, he blames his sexual assault on having a female trainer. That’s right, women happen to be around, and he happens to sexually assault them by placing his testicles on their faces, simple as that:

In the book he co-wrote with his father, Archie, and a ghostwriter, Manning: A Father, His Sons, and a Football Legacy, though he described his actions as “inappropriate,” he felt Naughright should have laughed off the up-close display of his rump and should have viewed it as “Crude, maybe, but harmless.” Manning also felt the need to call her a “vulgar woman,” swore that he was actually mooning a fellow teammate, not Naughright, and said that all of this unpleasantness could have been avoided were it not for the destruction of male-only spaces.

When Naughright rebuffed Manning, he decided to drop trou. Naughright had her head down, but upon hearing the chuckles and guffaws, she looked up only to find herself face-to-face with Manning’s exposed ass and testicles.

“It was the gluteus maximus, the rectum, the testicles and the area in between the testicles. And all that was on my face when I pushed him up,” Naughright would later say in a court deposition in a suit against the University of Tennessee (more on this in a bit). “To get leverage, I took my head out to push him up and off.”

How did UT discipline Manning? They took away his “privilege to eat at the athletic facilities dining room, and requiring him to run at 6:00 a.m. for two weeks.” The dining room ban was subsequently reduced to two weeks as well.

The allegations made against Manning came to light as one of numerous sexual harassment claims cited against the University of Tennessee. Naughright and the university ended up agreeing to a $300,000 settlement. The terms remained confidential.

But Manning needed to have the final word. In the book he co-wrote with his father, Archie, and a ghostwriter, Manning: A Father, His Sons, and a Football Legacy, though he described his actions as “inappropriate,” he felt Naughright should have laughed off the up-close display of his rump and should have viewed it as “Crude, maybe, but harmless.” Manning also felt the need to call her a “vulgar woman,” swore that he was actually mooning a fellow teammate, not Naughright, and said that all of this unpleasantness could have been avoided were it not for the destruction of male-only spaces.

“Never mind that women in the men’s locker room is one of the most misbegotten concessions to equal rights ever made,” Manning wrote. “When Dad played, there was still at least a tacit acknowledgment that women and men are two different sexes, with all that implies, and a certain amount of decorum had to be maintained. Meaning when it came to training rooms and shower stalls, the opposite sex was not allowed. Common sense tells you why.”

“Common sense” indeed. In 2002, Naughright filed a defamation lawsuit against Manning, claiming that he was attempting to rewrite history. Naughright had since moved on to Florida Southern College and though she wasn’t personally named by Manning in the book, she received a letter “addressed to ‘Dr. Vulgar Mouth Whited.’’’

The university paid Naughright $300,000, so it can’t claim that it had no knowledge of Manning’s sexual assault against this woman, but their dismissal of Naughright’s claims, and their treatment of her after the complaints were filed have now been used as an example of creating a culture of indifference to sexual assault:

A lawsuit accusing the University of Tennessee of mishandling reports of alleged sexual assaults by student athletes cites a 20-year-old complaint against then-Volunteers quarterback Peyton Manning as evidence of the school’s indifference.

Manning claims that if women weren’t nearby, he never would have assaulted them, and that pushing his testicles in a woman’s face is just the equivalent of “common sense.” (Note to Manning: sexual assault is not a common sense result of having women nearby.)

If you are wondering if anyone else spoke up about this, they did. Another man in the locker room, who was supposedly the recipient of what Manning coded as his “moon,” did state that what Manning did was wrong, and asserted that Manning was using his position of power to abuse Naughright:

As to the question of to whom Manning wanted to show his ass, Malcolm Saxon, a track and field athlete who was in the room during the incident, wrote a letter to Manning to say that no, he was not the intended moon-ee (as Manning had written in his book), imploring him to “maintain some dignity and admit to what happened… Your celebrity doesn’t mean you can treat folks that way… Do the right thing here.”

Naughright and Manning ended up agreeing to an out-of-court settlement in 2003 that included a confidentiality ban on both parties. “He felt it was his mistake, he tried to apologize and he was remorseful,” Archie Manning told the Associated Press of his son’s incident in 2003. “He got punished and he took his punishment.”

Manning, however, just couldn’t keep his mouth shut.

Naughright took Manning to court to enforce the gag order, but Manning kept talking, in a way reminiscent of Trump, to belittle the woman he had assaulted. Both Manning and Trump belittle women as a way of defending their sexual assaults. Really, is it any better to say you can’t rape your spouse, even if she says she felt raped, because the law doesn’t recognize spousal rape? (Just for the record, the law does recognize spousal rape in the US, but not in Turkey or Saudi Arabia. Perhaps Trump’s attorney got his nationality confused.) Is it any better for Manning to verbally attack Naughright, even though two courts have law have recognized Manning’s assault against her, to discredit Naughright as a means of “defending” himself against what was found to be true?

Why is the “blame the victim” response accepted in Peyton Manning and Trump, hell Bill Cosby? Why is it that famous men feel they can sexually assault women with immunity? Sports writers have this to say about the dynamic with Manning:

“For every classy part of Manning, the one that sells pizzas and says, ‘Golly gee and aw shucks,’ there is a bit of a ruthless guy, in my opinion,” he wrote. “This is not stated maliciously. It’s stated honestly. I think what he did with Jamie is an example of that. He does that [exposes himself] to her, which is a despicable thing, and then later in his book, takes a shot at her. That shot was calculated. It was a way of trying to diminish Jamie and her original accusations.”

Bill Cosby, Peyton Manning, Donald Trump, all men whose sexual assault allegations have not been proven false, in fact, most were verified, and yet, these men were not criminally charged. Does money really buy immunity? It might, from criminal charges, but it doesn’t from public opinion.

Peyton Manning is used as THE example of a culture of sexual assault allowed at his alma mater in a recent Title IX filing:

Filed on behalf of six unidentified accusers, the lawsuit alleges that the university violated federal Title IX regulations against sex discrimination and fostered “a hostile sexual environment and culture.”

The university denies permitting a culture of sexual assault to thrive.

The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Nashville last week, two days after Manning led the Denver Broncos to victory in Super Bowl 50. It centers on five alleged rapes of female students reported between 2013 and 2015.

 When Peyton Manning is used as the example of sexual assault, it really lowers Manning’s credibility as an all around innocent guy.

In support of its claim of “deliberate indifference” by administrators to sexual assaults at the 27,000-student public university in Knoxville, the complaint includes a string of alleged incidents involving student-athletes going back to 1995.

The lawsuit accuses the university of a pattern of “grossly inadequate discipline and resolution in favor of male, ‘major sports’ athletes.”

That favoritism, the complaint said, included “interfering with and stopping the disciplinary process, concealing charges and investigations involving male athletes, arranging for specialized defense counsel for male athletes … facing criminal and sexual assault charges.”

One incident listed as an example in the lawsuit is a 1996 sexual assault complaint against Manning by the university’s first female associate trainer

University of Tennessee denies that it creates a rape culture, but just this past week, another University of Tennessee football player was accused of sexual battery:

This week, in an incident not related to the Title IX lawsuit, University of Tennessee police said defensive tackle Alexis Johnson was charged with sexual battery, false imprisonment and domestic assault. The alleged assault occurred at a residence hall on Sunday.

Ryan Robinson, the university’s athletics communications director, said in a statement that Johnson “has been suspended from all football activities” but declined further comment.

In the five alleged sexual assaults cited in the Title IX lawsuit, only two — involving prominent former members of the football team — resulted in criminal charges, Smith said. The men, who are awaiting trial, remained in school. One attended his graduation.

When Peyton Manning is used as an example of a sexual predator allowed to go unpunished in a Title IX lawsuit, it means that the image he has so carefully crafted with the media “good ole boys” club is starting to crumble. Note to Trump: even Cosby has fallen.

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